Pneumatic And Hydraulic Equipment Page 704

Micro-Fog Tool Lubricators - For lubrication of one or more air driven tools or devices. Micro-Fog Lubricators inject a finely divided fog of oil into a flowing stream of compressed air to automatically provide the proper internal lubrication of air operated tools and other devices. Oil is injected only when there is an air flow thru the lubricator. Micro-Fog density is controlled by the drip rate adjusting knob (1). Counterclockwise rotation of the knob increases and clockwise rotation decreases the Micro-Fog density. The lubricator uses a flexible flow sensor (5) to control the flow of a small amount of inlet air into the reservoir (9) thru the fog generator (3) in proportion to the air flow past the sensor. The high velocity air flowing through the generator aspirates oil up the siphon tube (8) into the sight-feed dome (2), where it drips downward through the needle valve orifice (4) into the generator. The oil drops are then atomized and mixed with air flowing thru the generator into the reservoir. Most of the larger oil particles return to the reservoir. The finer particles (Micro-Fog) remain airborne and are carried thru the passage (6) into the downstream system. Only a small portion of the drops visible in the sight-feed dome are delivered downstream to the device being lubricated. The proportionate control afforded by the flow sensor provides a nearly constant oil-to-air density ratio over a wide range of air flows. The check ball (7) keeps the siphon tube full during periods of no flow. When pressurized, Micro-Fog Lubricators can only be filled with oil when equipped with an optional quick-fill cap or remote fill device. Oil-Fog Tool Lubricators - For lubrication of a single air driven tool or device. Oil-Fog Lubricators inject a fog of oil into a flowing stream of compressed air to automatically provide the proper internal lubrication of one air operated tool or other device. Oil is injected only when there is an air flow through the lubricator. The lubricator reservoir (5) is pressurized through the charge valve (4). Whenever there is an air flow thru the lubricator, the flexible flow sensor (3) in the lubricator throat creates a small pressure drop that is proportional to the rate of air flow. The drop in pressure is sensed in the sight-feed dome (2) thru the nozzle passage (7). This establishes a pressure drop across the needle valve orifice (6) which aspirates oil upward thru the siphon tube (9) into the sight-feed dome where it drips into the nozzle passage and then into the lubricator throat. The adjusting knob (1) controls the oil drip rate. The oil drops are atomized by the air flowing through the lubricator throat and are carried downstream as oil-fog. All the drops visible in the sight-feed dome are delivered downstream to the device being lubricated. The proportional control afforded by the flow sensor provides a nearly constant oil-to-air density ratio over a wide range of air flows. The check ball (8) keeps the siphon tube full of oil during periods of no air flow. The charge valve (4) controls the rate of reservoir pressurization and allows depressurization for refilling without shutting off the air pressure. When the oil fill plug (not shown) is loosened, a bleed orifice is exposed which reduces the reservoir pressure. This pressure causes the charge valve (4) to close and restrict air flow into the reservoir to eliminate blow-back when adding fresh oil. When the fill plug is replaced, the reservoir repressurizes through the charge valve. The charge valve opens when inlet pressure is reached. The charge valve is not used with bidirec- tional lubricators and lubricators having 2 or 5 gallon reservoirs. These lubricators can be refilled under pressure . Bearing Lubricators - For lubrication of machine bearings. Bearing Lubricators inject a fog of oil into a flowing stream of compressed air to automatically provide the proper lubrication of bearings and gears in industrial machines. Air entering the lubricator flows thru the venturi (1) into the reservoir (2). The air passing thru the venturi creates a pressure differential which aspirates oil from the reservoir up the siphon tube (3) to the sight-feed dome (4) where it drips into the venturi. The air and oil action at the venturi creates a finely divided oil aerosol in the upper part of the oil reservoir. Most of the larger particles fall out, returning to the oil reservoir. The smaller particles (Micro-Fog) remain airborne and are carried thru the air line to points of lubrication. Only a small portion of the drops visible in the sight-feed dome are delivered downstream to the device being lubricated. Bearing Lubricators have a lower air flow capacity, higher pressure drop, and produce denser Micro-Fog than Tool Lubricators. LUBRICATOR OPERATION Norgren pneumatics (314) 427-0600 800-444-0522 (FAX) 314-427-3502 www. j hf.com JHF Catalog [ Volume 7 ] 704 Prices Subject to Change Without Notice John Henry Foster pneumatic and hydraulic equipment

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